the 'get' corner: a place where games meet eye tracking
search this blog
recent posts

The 4 Most Influential People in Video Games

Curing hunger with... FarmVille

'Videojogos 2011' Conference

The Eye Tracking Laptop Video Presentation

Eye Tracking comes to the laptop

Portugal's Political Crisis

'Strenghts' and 'Weaknesses' of Eye Tracking

How men...look at men: the unspoken truth

SBGames 2010 [Day 3]

SBGames 2010 [Day 2]

the archive

Outubro 2011

Setembro 2011

Julho 2011

Março 2011

Dezembro 2010

Novembro 2010

Outubro 2010

Quarta-feira, 17 de Novembro de 2010
SBGames 2010 [Day 1]

It's been about 10 days since I arrived in Brazil. The SBGames 2010 conference wrapped up exactly a week ago, on the 10th. Overall, I think it was a very good conference!

Around 800 participants, mainly (naturally) from Brazil showed up to discuss video games and all its questions. Organizing an event for 800 people isn't easy and naturally minor glitches occurred here and there... but I think the organization did a good job!

 

Many, many papers were presented. Many, many topics were discussed. However, because multiple sessions occurred during the day, I wasn't able to view them all.

Nonetheless, I did assist all the main keynotes, all of them very, very interesting.

And the next three blog posts will focus mainly on the content of these keynotes, spread throughout Day 1, Day 2 and Day 3 of the conference.

 

Day 1

 

The main keynote speaker of Day 1 was Don Marinelli. Don Marinelli, a drama professor from Carneggie Mellon University (CMU), is co-founder of the Entertainment Technology Center (ETC), a department of the CMU. The other co-founder was the late Randy Pausch. You might remember Randy Pausch for having delivered 'The Last Lecture: Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams' before passing away a couple of years ago. Together they founded the ETC, and from what Don explained, it sounds like a wonderful place to study at.

 

 

Don Marinelli presented the talk 'Triumph of the Gamer'. It was a wonderful talk, filled with moments of reflection and of laughter. Don, being a drama professor, is also a wonderful entertainer and certainly knows how to capture the crowd (not that it's a bad thing). But all ears were on him during an hour.

Many things were said. He told of his adventure of getting mixed into computer science. Something most people would find very odd considering his background in drama and theatre. But his passion for entertainment and games led him down that road and towards meeting Randy Paush.

While it is hard to summarize all that he referred to in his talk, I did jot down a couple of notes; a couple of ideas that caught my attention.

 

 

'Students are smarter than teachers'. Why? Because they know more about technology. Is it true? To some extent, I'd say yes. Of course the term 'technology' has to be refined to more precise examples. Naturally some students are pros in web2.0 services that some teachers don't know exist or have only had minimal contact with. But of course teachers are smarter than their students in so many other things. And we can't forget that today, the internet is jam-packed full of information on almost any area of knowledge. It isn't hard for a student to sit down and read up on information he'll learn the next day in a classroom.

'We don't need books to be smart. Are video games/technology the books of the future?' It's quite possible. More than one 'opinion maker', some highly recognized, have referred that books in their traditional format will disappear in the following years. Learning by then will no longer be 'by the book', but rather... through technology and other instruments. While I find the idea interesting... it is kind of hard to believe that areas such as medicine or law can 'generate' med students or future lawyers all they need to know without 1000 page books. But I'm sure in a good couple of years there will be more than one good solution to teach. ...maybe games?

Don continued his talk and spoke of how his area of expertise ties in closely with that of computer science... and naturally, games. 'Storytelling is a craft' he stated; and the use of 'improvisational acting' in the course is not only good for creativity, but helps with non-linear narratives as well as team-building.

Don's talk was full of interesting ideas and reflections. His final thoughts were education based as he stated that education is definitely the next 'game-frontier'

 

While this summary is far from sufficient to explain all the things that were discussed, it's a starter. All that's left to say is 'thank you Don, for a wonderful talk!'.

 


tags: , ,

published by sja às 17:07

1

De rnmarques a 13 de Dezembro de 2010 às 11:29
Boas Sam,

Olha, estava nas minhas pesquisas e encontrei sobre um artigo e eye-tracking . O problema é que não consigo extrair o artigo .

http://www.itu.dk/docadm/detail.php?DocID=1808

Um Abraço ;)


comment post

more about me
Outubro 2011
Dom
Seg
Ter
Qua
Qui
Sex
Sab

1

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

16
17
18
20
21
22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29

30
31


tags

todas as tags

links
subscrever feeds

RSSPosts

RSSComentários

RSSComentários do post

stats